Music Festivals: The Perfect Place for Experiential Marketing

Posted in Music Tickets

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August is almost upon us and music-festival season is currently in full swing! When people think of music festivals, images of bands, DJs, dance tents, mud, wellies, alcohol and camping all come to mind. However, businesses (and festival organisers) should consider the fact that music festivals, with their hoards of carefree and impressionable attendees, are the perfect place to stage experiential marketing events.

Experiential marketing, also called ‘engagement marketing’, ‘event marketing’, ‘live marketing’ or ‘participation marketing’, places emphasis on consumers taking an active role in the marketing process, not just a passive one. It often involves getting passersby to take part in an event or trial.

In a study by New York agency Jack Morton, it was revealed that a staggering 93 percent of participants agreed that experiential marketing generates advocacy and word-of-mouth recommendations.

Why Are Festivals Ideal?

A survey conducted by the Association of Independent Festivals found festival goers spent £213m in 2012, with an average spend of £382.49 per person.

A similar survey conducted by MSN for the website Gigwise found that the average age of a festivalgoer is 36 years old and they spend an average of £420 per festival, including the ticket, travel and food and drink expenses.

Put simply, people are willing to spend money and invest time in attending and making the most of festivals.

In an environment where people bring only the essentials (due to space restrictions and security reasons) people love being given free sample products and free services.

 

What Successful Experiential Campaigns Have Been Done in the Past?

  • Kommando’s experiential marketing campaign for battery brand Duracell helped the company reach out to festival goers through an on-site battery charging station and exchange.

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  • Drink brand Jagermeister appears at various festivals with its ‘Deep Freeze’ ice bar.
  • Kellogg’s ‘Kraving’ campaign at festivals focused on promoting their new ‘Tunes and Spoons’ campaign for their Krave cereal. The cereal was promoted as a convenient yet healthy option and whilst consumers were choosing from two types of cereal, music was playing in the background. Kelloggs were ultimately targeting young individuals who are known to skip breakfast.
  • Sleek MakeUP set up ‘Shades of Summer’ pop-up shops at Wireless and Lovebox festival. Beauty consultants and trained brand ambassadors offered free makeovers to festival goers whist educating them about the benefits of the Sleek MakeUP range. This campaign delivered over £45,000 worth of sales and increased Sleek MakeUP’s consumer database by over 17,600 people. The campaign resulted in an average of £16 spent per transaction.
  • Watch a video below of Sleek MakeUp’s experiential marketing campaign at various UK festivals!

 

Things to Think About…

The key to executing an experiential campaign at a music festival seems to be having engaging, enthusiastic and extremely professional promo staff, and the promotional staff from Breeze People have had experience working at festivals across the country.

Make sure to thoroughly consider what products and services people at festivals will truly appreciate and engage with!

Three Top Tips For Planning Your Event

Posted in Event Holding

When it comes to planning an event of almost any kind, there’s certain things which you need to take in consideration and certain things which must ultimately take preference when planning. Some things are perfectly fine to be left until last minute, however others need to ideally be planned months in advance if you want to ensure that your event is a success. As such, we’ve decided to put together three top tips for planning an event:

1. Choosing A Venue

You can’t do anything until you’ve found a venue for your event and, as such, it needs to be the first thing you do. You can’t book acts, promote it or even begin to think about sorting tickets until your venue is confirmed so spend some time researching suitable venues and get one confirmed. A few key things to consider are the location, capacity and cost and the perfect venue should always be a trade-off between these three. You’ll hopefully know the best local venues but if you’re struggling, the likes of Venue Finder may be able to help!

2. Booking An Act

Once you’ve got a venue confirmed, it’s time to start booking your acts! Whether these are live bands, DJ’s or speakers, you’ll know better than anyone what you’re going for and will hopefully be in a position to approach those who you want playing! Just bear in mind that the sooner you get in touch, the more likely an act will be available…don’t expect miracles if you’re planning a last minute event!

3. Sorting The Sound System

Every event will need a sound system of some sort and many venues still don’t have in-house PA systems. As such, the best option is usually to hire a PA system from a local hire company. Spend some time chatting with those over your needs and requirements and be sure to have to hand information on your venue, the capacity and the type of event you’re running. They’ll then be in a position to advise on the most appropriate and suitable system. In terms of who to contact, always consider your local company but in London why not consider London Speaker Hire or in Essex, what about A.T. Music Group?

Above all, planning an event can be time consuming, however when you get it right and have a packed room full of punters enjoying themselves, it’s a very, very rewarding feeling!

Cheap Ways to Help Make Your Band Successful

Posted in DJ's, Event Holding, Music

Whether you play in front of your friends or crowds of thousands of adoring fans, there are certain steps that your band must take in order to be taken seriously. It is no secret that making it as a band is hard and there are thousands of bands that for whatever reason fail to break into the commercial market. Now there is no sure fire way to ensure that your band is going to be successful but there are certain steps that you really should take to give it the best chance of succeeding.

First and foremost you must take it seriously; if you are really hoping for a successful music career then you must treat your band and band duties as work and act accordingly. Designated practice sessions are vital to ensuring that your ability both as an individual and as a band continue to improve, treat these practice times as though you were at work and you will find that you become far more productive. If you take your work seriously then it is far more likely that people will take you seriously and are more likely to invest in you. There are many places out there dedicated to spotting new talent such as the BBC, why not look here for more information on getting your music some attention.

Secondly is to build a real band identity, cover versions are great to start with and can really help you to see what direction you want to take, after a while though you need to start creating your own material. If you have a similar mindset and ability as the rest of your band then this process will happen very naturally and will be incredibly rewarding.  Once you have perfected a few tracks then it is worth putting together a CD of your sound to distribute among friends and family, ask them to be honest and you will receive useful feedback. If you are unsure of how to go about making a CD then click here for a link to a company that can help you.

Arguably the most important step is to arrange gigs for your band to showcase your talent to the public, there is nothing like a drunken pub crowd to let you know if you are substandard. The impact of these gigs is helped by having the right sort of equipment; the right lighting can change it from an open-mic night to a real gig experience for your audience. If you want to be taken seriously but perhaps cannot afford the expensive equipment needed then fear not as you can always rent this equipment, follow this link for a specialist supplier of lighting and DJ equipment.

So if you want to start out in a band or are just stuck in a rut with your band then why not follow these simple steps to really change the fortune of your musical career.

Top 5 essentials for the summer’s festivals

Posted in Festivals

FestivalWith the British summer in full swing and each weekend offering another selection of large and small festivals across the country, it’s the perfect opportunity to take a few days’ holiday and get back to nature. Here is a top 5 list of the must have summer festival essentials:

1. Ticket – As obvious as it sounds many people can fall at the first hurdle and fail to get a ticket to their favourite festival. Tickets usually go on sale during the autumn and winter months and depending on demand can sell out within hours.  Use well known ticketing sights such as See Tickets to see what’s on and to avoid purchasing fraudulent tickets.

2. Tent – The majority of festivals including camping for the weekend, meaning you need to invest in a good tent. Have a listen to this BBC Radio 4 show  talking about the rise in popularity of the pop up tent and how they have revolutionised the festival experience. The ease and speed of carrying and putting up a pop up tent lets festival goers spend less time struggling with heavy bags, guide ropes and tent pegs and more time enjoying the weekend. Companies like Cinch Pop Up Tents have great examples of the latest lightweight pop up tents for you to have a look at. In addition to the tent, try and source some form of deck chair or stool so you can avoid sitting in puddles and mud if the weather decides to try and spoil your fun.

3. Food and Drink – Even though every festival will have a good range of food and drink stalls onsite, their price and quality can differ a lot. To save a bit of money, make sure you pack a bit of food in your bag for mornings and night time when you’re most likely to get a little peckish. Biscuits, crisps, sausage rolls and other such picnic foods are perfect for festivals, requiring no effort and staying fresh throughout the weekend. Avoid anything that needs cooking and food that goes off quickly as these will begin to frustrate you and smell over time. Most festivals have restrictions on glass bottles so to avoid having your alcohol confiscated make sure you dispense everything into plastic bottles before arriving.

4. Wellies – As beautiful as the weather may seem conditions can rapidly change at a festival, going from a dust bowl to a swamp in a matter of hours. Invest in a good pair of wellies to tackle the unpredictable weather and they may just be the difference between happiness and misery. Make sure your wellies, and all other footwear, are comfortable and fit nicely, as four days of constant wear in uncomfortable shoes can have fairly nasty consequences. Take a look at some great festival wellies from companies such as Welly Warehouse and pick a pair to travel with you to every future festival.

5. Essential Kit – The final piece of advice is to have a bag of essential care products to provide some necessary comfort and hygiene for the festival. The most important of these is sun cream, as you will spend considerable time in direct sunlight with no assurance of shade during the hottest times of the day. A decent hat and sunglasses will also help you avoid suffering at the hands of the sun and getting sunstroke. Baby wipes can double up as wash wipes and toilet roll, keeping you clean and fresh even if the weather decides to turn. Finally paracetamol may well prove to be your best friend the morning after a night of festivities, as a headache will not make you feel ready for another day of music and merriment.

Whether you are a festival veteran or a first timer these simple tips will help you cover all the essentials, allowing you to make the most of your weekend and enjoy the event. The best advice is to know your limits and look after your body. If you start to feel the heat take an hour or so to regenerate and keep well hydrated and this way you can keep going for the whole weekend.

The Spotify Debate: Building Your Band with Digital Downloads

Posted in Music

Some conversations simply never go away: as video killed the radio star, so too have downloads made trawling through the racks in a record store a rare occurrence. Digital music is here to stay but the question is how and where to source it. Thom Yorke and long-time collaborator, Nigel Godrich have refused to include this year’s Amok album on the popular Spotify service and have also removed Radiohead’s back catalogue. Their beef is that the service pays a pittance per stream of a song and artists are losing out. Their move away from the site is a protest vote. You can read more about the debate on the Guardian website, www.guardian.co.uk/music/shortcuts/2013/jul/15/spotify-musicians-money-thom-yorke.

The merits and demerits of Spotify are difficult to quantify. For music fans, it can be a great resource as it allows you to try before you buy a new album whilst the ‘similar artists’ function can be a great way of finding new music. The collection is somewhat greater than that of your local record store although you might miss the cardigan and beard that record store owners invariably sported. Being able to take a virtual tour through musical history is appealing though. Whether through Spotify, Bandcamp, iTunes, YouTube or Amazon, you can build up a vast network of musical knowledge and preferences and organise your libraries of music in the way you wish.

The argument is that bands receive next to nothing in exchange for their work. For a stream on Spotify, bands can expect to receive a fraction of a penny per track. You can see in The Guardian an estimate of revenue bands can receive from various endeavours, http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/shortcuts/2013/jul/15/spotify-musicians-money-thom-yorke?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487 : compare a fraction of a penny for a stream on Spotify to the thousands of pounds bands can make from allowing their music to be used in an advertising campaign.

Many believe that downloads and albums are better considered as sales pitches for live gigs, given that the latter makes bands more money. Nonetheless, there are several added functions with digital downloads and many new ways to use them. Not only does adding a digital download to a CD or vinyl release add value and convenience for the customer but they also allow bands to generate mailing lists and online contacts as individuals often have to register to access the tracks. Key Production have come up with a few more great ways of using digital downloads. If you look at their website, www.keyproduction.co.uk/services/mp3-download, you can see how you can register with them and they will give you special access codes and a URL link for downloads which you can apply as a sticker to anything you like! This could be merchandise at a gig, a business card or even used in a guerrilla marketing strategy.

When trying to build the reputation of your band, it is important to think holistically about how to show off the things you do best! Longevity is more than likely a greater aim than riches. Great gigs will be spoken about for years to come and with sites like SoundHalo, http://soundhalo.com/ you can have them immortalised and available for fans to download and keep.

By harnessing these new ways of using digital technology, bands can build and maintain a profile based on the things they wish to be known for, whether that’s great studio recordings or stellar live performances. It is for every artist to decide for themselves which mediums to utilise; Spotify is one of many options and arguably, this potential to choose is one of the best things about digital culture.